Tips for locating immunization records

Immunization records (sometimes called vaccination records) provide a history of all the vaccines you (or your child) have received. Keeping current immunization records for you (and your children) is important. These records may be required for certain jobs, travel, or school registration. 

Tips for locating your immunization records

There is no central registry of all immunizations provided in BC. If you need a copy of your immunization records, there are several places you can look:

  • Check your home for your paper record of immunization. Try looking through baby books or other saved documents from your childhood.
  • Check with your parents or other caregivers to see if they have a record of your immunizations.
  • Check with your current and previous family doctors. Keep in mind that immunization records are kept at doctors’ offices for a limited time.
  • Check with your community health centre if you were immunized at the health centre or in school.

Without a record of immunization (or proof of immunity to a disease), a person is considered unimmunized and unprotected and should generally be vaccinated (or revaccinated) to ensure protection. It is safe to repeat vaccines. You can also have your blood tested for antibodies to determine your immunity to certain diseases. Your health care provider can help you determine what is best for you.

Tips for locating your child's immunization records

There is no central registry of all immunizations provided in BC. If you do not have a copy of your child's immunization records, there are several places you can look:

  • Check your home for your child’s paper record of immunizations. Try looking through baby books or other saved documents. In B.C. childhood immunizations are most often recorded in the Child Health Passport.
  • Check with your community health centre if your child was immunized at the health centre or in school. Health centres in B.C. maintain an electronic registry of childhood immunizations provided by public health nurses.
  • Check with your child’s doctor if your child was immunized at their doctor’s office.

Children without immunization records (or proof of immunity to a disease) are considered unimmunized and unprotected. These children should generally be vaccinated (or revaccinated) to ensure protection. It is safe to repeat vaccines. Speak to your child’s health care provider for more information.