School Age Immunizations

Did you know?

Public health nurses can:

  • Provide your child’s vaccines
  • Check your child’s record for other missing routine vaccines
  • Give missing routine vaccines to your child
  • Answer your immunization questions

Vaccines are a healthy choice for your child. They protect your child from diseases that can cause serious illness, disability and death.  

In BC, school-age children are offered immunizations in grade 6 and in grade 9.

These immunizations are offered at school throughout the school year.  

Grade 6 immunizations

The following vaccines are routinely offered to students in grade 6: 

For more information about grade 6 immunizations in BC, please see the HealthLink BC File: Grade 6 Immunizations in B.C.

I Lost My Friend To Meningitis

It only took 4 days for meningitis to take Leo's life.

Grade 9 immunizations

The following vaccines are routinely offered to all students in grade 9: 

For more information about grade 6 immunizations in BC, please see the HealthLink BC File: Grade 9 Immunizations in B.C.

Consent for Immunizations

You will receive a package from your child’s school that contains a consent form and information on the different vaccines your child needs.  It’s important to read all of the information in the package and to sign the consent form and return it to your child’s school.  Call your public health unit, or speak with your doctor if you have any questions.

Consent Forms

Consent for Grade 6 Immunizations

Consent for Grade 9 Immunizations

Mature Minor Consent

It is recommended that parents or guardians and their children discuss consent for immunization. Children under the age of 19, who are able to understand the benefits and possible reactions for each vaccine and the risk of not getting immunized, can legally consent to or refuse immunizations. For more information on mature minor consent see: HealthLinkBC File: The Infants Act, Mature Minor Consent and Immunization.

Questions?

You can call your local public health unit and ask to speak to a Public Health Nurse or speak to your primary health care provider.

School Age schedule