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The answers in the Q&A are not altered or updated after the published date.  For current information and recommendations, consult your health care provider.

There is currently no recommendation for an additional dose of the shingles vaccine (Zostavax). However, the new shingles vaccine (Shingrix) is available for purchase from some pharmacies and travel clinics.  Please speak to your immunization provider for recommendations.

Immunization Nurse

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Many pharmacies and community health centres/health units are still providing flu shots. We recommend that you use our Flu Clinic finder to find a location near you that has flu vaccine. You will find information here. If your son is not eligible for free flu vaccine, a pharmacy or travel clinic would be your best bet.

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Please contact your local community health centre/public health unit to find out if there is a harm reduction service where you live. In some communities you can dispose of containers by bringing it to your local pharmacy depending on its contents. Services vary by community.

Immunization Nurse

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Providing that minimum intervals are met (minimum intervals are the shortest time between two doses of a vaccine in a multi-dose series in which a protective response to the subsequent dose can be expected), you may be able to take your child in early. Please call your local community health centre/public health unit and ask to speak to a public health nurse.

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Inactivated vaccines are generally safe in pregnancy. Tetanus is an inactivated vaccine. If a pregnant woman is due for a tetanus shot, there is no cost. The tetanus, diphtheria and pertussis (Tdap) vaccine may be recommended for pregnant women at 26 weeks of pregnancy or later who have not received a dose of pertussis-containing vaccine in adulthood.

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